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Faculty of History and Cultural Studies

Interdisciplinary courses related to this department

For more interdisciplinary courses related to this department please click here:

Course Title: 0401 Jewish women in Eastern Europe

Course Description

At the seminar we will work with memoirs and diaries of Jewish women from Eastern Europe. Sources of this type provide us with rich material about the traditional life of the Jewish community, about the role and place of women in it (descriptions of family and religious life, marriage customs, living quarters, education, Jewish holidays and rituals, married life, etc.). Rapid transformations - the development of industry, urbanization, and active migration, assimilation affected the life of the Jewish community as a whole and the fate of women. How women described the impact of modernity and general societal changes in Jewish life and especially in the life of Jewish women? We will talk about the experience of Jewish women who have adapted to the socio-economic and ideological challenges of the time and will explore the role of gender in the construction of Jewish identity in the modern period.

Faculty

History and Cultural Studies

Institute

Historical Institute

Lecturer

Prof. Dr. Iryna Ramanava

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

17/10/2022-10/02/2023

Mode and Time

Synchronous (live), Time (CET): to be announced

Online Tool for Teaching

Zoom or Webex

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Bachelor, Master 

Prerequisites

none

ECTS

5

Course Title: 0402 ‘Discovering' and Charting the (New) World - Knowledge, Expedition and Exploration in Early Modernity

Course Description

Today maps seem to be the primary way of understanding and imagining the world, their construction of space and borders shape the way we approach our surroundings and what we ‘know’ about them. This concept of space and the medial element of maps, as well as written descriptions of the space ‘discovered’ and ‘explored’, played an important role in European colonialism all over the World, especially when it comes to the Americas and Oceania.

This course will look at the role of media and knowledge in the ‘explorations’ and expedition by Europeans from Columbus to Cook in Early Modernity (1500-1800), as well as the influences of these trips on what and how something can be ‘known’, and its effects on the way we think and act today.

To pass the writing of an essay or the holding of a presentation will be required, as well as regular participation in the discussions of the reading every week. 

Faculty

History and Cultural Studies

Institute

Historical Institute, Early Modern Times

Lecturer

Rosswag, Bennet

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

17/10/2022-10/02/2023

Mode and Time

Synchronous, Time (CET): Tuesday, 16:00-18:00

Online Tool for Teaching

BBB

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Bachelor, Master 

Prerequisites

Good English, Interest in early modern history

ECTS

3

Course Title: 0403 In Matters of Prestige: Archaeology and Cultural Imperialism in the 19th Century

Course Description

“No one has ever devised a method for detaching the scholar from the circumstances of life […] there is such a thing as knowledge that is less […] partial than the individual […] who produces it. Yet, this knowledge is not therefore automatically nonpolitical.” (Said 1978, 10)

Archaeology is not a value-free social science. External factors – the social, cultural and political context – shape the practice of archaeology. To understand the history of archaeology it is necessary to evaluate the impact of the socio-political framework(s) in which it developed. In the 19th century, a period in which the discipline of archaeology slowly formed itself to the discipline as we know it today and major archaeological discoveries were being made eg. by German, English, American and French archaeologists, nationalism, imperialism and colonialism were dominant features of the powers of the Western world.

This tutorial sets out to investigate the influence of politics in 19th century’s archaeology by simultaneously developing a knowledge transfer concept. Who practiced, promoted and funded archaeology with what interest? Why were certain ancient cultures and even certain types of antiquities considered worthier studying than others and what effect has this selective approach had on the research on ancient cultures? Finally, what happened when countries with ancient monumental remains started to claim the antiquities as symbols of their own national past and therefore banned the export of antiquities and the attempt of the European powers to control the archaeology of the Great Civilisations encountered resistance?

Faculty

History and Cultural Studies

Institute

Ancient Studies – Classical Archaeology

Lecturer

Dr. Claudia Schmieder

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

17/10/2022-10/02/2023

Mode and Time

Synchronous, Time (CET): Wednesdays, 16:00-18:00

Online Tool for Teaching

BBB

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Bachelor, Master 

Prerequisites

Knowledge of the German language is desired

ECTS

4

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