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Faculty of Law

Course Title: 0102 Gender and Intersectionality in Peace and Conflict Studies

Course Description

The seminar deals with the current debates on gender and intersectionality in the context of conflicts and peacebuilding processes. The course will address the international legal instruments for combating gender-based violence as well as for the inclusion of women in peacebuilding and decision-making processes. It also implies an analysis of gender-based violence in times of conflict as well as in peace times. This will show how while certain forms of gender-based violence are strongly criticized in the public sphere, others remain invisible, naturalized, and even legitimized by large segments of the population. Throughout the course, the analysis of specific case studies will illustrate the contradictions between the struggle, achievements, and successes of women's movements, on the one hand, and the challenges still pending to eradicate geneder based violence in times of peace and war, on the other. In doing so, the course will address the following questions: what role do gender and intersectionality play in the perpetration of violence in armed conflicts? What gender perspectives do peacebuilding and transitional justice mechanisms incorporate to deal with the  legacyof gender-based violence following dictatorships and armed conflict? Do transitional justice instruments include sufficient intersectional perspectives in the search for truth, justice, and reparations?

 

Faculty

Law/Social Sciences/Political Sciences

Institute

Chair for Peace Studies

Lecturer

Dr. Rosario Figari Layús

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

20/10/21-16/02/22

Mode and Time

Synchronous, Time (CET): Wednesdays, 14:00-16:00

Online Tool for Teaching

Webex

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Bachelor, Master

Prerequisites

English B2 or better

ECTS

6

Course Title: 0103 Sustainable Development – Oxymoron or Joint Effort?

Course Description

Sustainable development has been shaping (inter-) national policy ever since the Bruntland report from 1987 defined it as ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’. On the one hand, the concept has evolved into a political guideline represented by the United Nations’ launch of the Sustainable Development Goals, and on the other hand, into a buzzword used by different stakeholders both in the business and activist sector. This seminar aims at unpacking the manifold layers beyond sustainable development discussing both (post-) development discourses and key concepts surrounding sustainability. While giving a broad introduction into the field of sustainable development in the first part of the seminar, the second part delves into the complexity of so called ‘wicked problems’ concentrating i.a. on natural resource-based development models and the imperial mode of living. The seminar draws from examples from both Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa.

 

Faculty

Law/Social Sciences

Institute

Chair for Peace Studies

Lecturer

Julia Schwab, M.Sc.

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

19/10/21-15/02/22

Mode and Time

Synchronous, Time (CET): Tuesdays, 16:00-18:00

Online Tool for Teaching

Webex

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Bachelor of Social Sciences, and Cultural Studies 

Prerequisites

English B2 or better

ECTS

6

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