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Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences and Environmental Management

Course Title: 0901 Agriculture, Ecosystem Functioning and Climate Change

Course Description

Abiotic controlling factors in agriculture and for ecosystem functioning;
Biochemical processes of CO2, nitrous oxide and methane release in agriculture;
Calculation methods of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture on various spatial scales;
Climate as driver of biodiversity change;
Climate mitigation and adaptation strategies in agriculture;
CO2 footprints of agricultural products

Faculty

Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences, and Environmental Management

Institute

Institute of Landscape Ecology and Resources Management

Lecturer

Prof. Dr. Rainer Waldhardt

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

18/10/21-18/02/22

Mode and Time

Synchronous, Time (CET): Tuesday, 08.15h-11.45h

Online Tool for Teaching

Webex

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Master

Prerequisites

Bachelor

ECTS

6

Course Title: 0902 Applied Statistics

Course Description
  • Analysis of variance
  • Comparison of treatments
  • Mixed linear models
  • Experimental designs
  • Data analysis using statistical software
Faculty

Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences, and Environmental Management

Institute

Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding II

Lecturer

Prof. Dr. Matthias Frisch

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

18/10/21-18/02/22

Mode and Time

Synchronous and asynchronous, Time (CET): to be announced

Online Tool for Teaching

Stud.IP, Jitsi, YouTube

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Master

Fields of Study: Natural Sciences

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge in statistics; English: B2

ECTS

6

Course Title: 0903 Theory and Practice of Economic Development

Course Description

The course introduces the students to key concepts for analysing economic development and applies them to a range of current development topics. I place specific emphasis on the role of natural resources and institutions in the process of development. While the course takes an economics perspective, it considers economic development as a multidisciplinary topic and integrates viewpoints from neighbouring social sciences into a problem-centred approach. It is divided into four parts (I to IV), each consisting of three sessions. Starting with an introduction to essential theories and models of economic growth and structural change in part I, the roles of natural resources and agriculture will be explored in part II. Part III focuses on institutions and the pivotal governance mechanisms of growth and development. In part IV, I will extend the concepts learned so far to investigate current problems of finance and development aid, culture, corruption, religion and violent conflict. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to case studies and applications with a specific eye on emerging and transition economies.

Faculty

Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences, and Environmental Management

Institute

Department of Agricultural Policy and Market Research

Lecturer

Prof. Dr. Martin Petrick

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

18/10/21-18/02/22

Mode and Time

Asynchronous

Online Tool for Teaching

ILIAS

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Master

Fields of study: Agriculture, Nutrition, Natural or Environmental Sciences, Economics, Political Sciences

Prerequisites

Basic understanding of economics and statistics; English: B2

ECTS

6

Course Title: 0904 Global Food Markets

Course Description

This course will investigate how global food systems and international agricultural trade can contribute to achieving the goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (in particular SDG 2 “Zero hunger”). Therefore, we will look at past and current trends shaping the world food economy and identify key drivers of change. We will focus on the contributions of international trade and global value chains in respect of global food security. We will discuss which measures are taken at global, regional, and national levels that influence food prices and make food systems more inclusive and safe.
We will first deepen our understanding of the effects of past and current events on food supply and demand with the help of basic economic analysis. We will then look at why nations trade, what they trade, and who gains from this trade by drawing on economic concepts and models of international trade. We will analyze the welfare implications of agricultural trade policy (e.g., tariffs and quotas) and domestic food policy schemes (e.g., production subsidies and consumption taxes) using micro-economic tools. We will stress the role of consumers, emerging new technologies, and standard-setting bodies in shaping global value chains.
In this course, you will further deepen your knowledge and understanding of global food systems by independently working with scientific literature and prepare a scientific presentation. We will therefore discuss guidelines of good scientific practice.

Faculty

Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences, and Environmental Management

Institute

Department of Agricultural Policy and Market Research

Lecturer

Prof. Dr. Ramona Teuber

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

18/10/21-18/02/22

Mode and Time

Synchronous, Time (CET): to be announced

Online Tool for Teaching

Stud.IP, ILIAS, MS Teams

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Master

Fields of study: Agriculture, Nutrition, Natural or Environmental Sciences, Economics, Political Sciences

Prerequisites

Basic understanding of economics and statistics; English: B2

ECTS

6

Course Title: 0905 Climate Change and Economic Development

Course Description

Successfully tackling climate change crucially depends on emissions reductions in emerging and developing countries. At the same time, emerging economies like China and India grow fast so that their carbon emissions increase. The challenge is to decouple economic growth and resource use. Others countries like Sub-Sahara African countries are stuck in poverty and will additionally be hit by climate change. The challenge is to lift those countries up to a more optimistic development path. Moreover, coastal regions and islands are under risk of flooding so that life might become impossible there. 
Against this backdrop, it is in the first step necessary to get a clear picture of these risks in different developing regions. It is in the second step important to think about the potential of climate mitigation and adaptation measures to reduce these risks. Since developing countries lack advanced technologies, we also need to think about market-based mechanisms of international technology diffusion and possible policy instruments to support technology transfer. These instruments are for example green technology funds, a future Clean Development Mechanism or intellectual property rights.

Faculty

Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences, and Environmental Management

Institute

Department of Agricultural Policy and Market Research

Lecturer

Dr. Michael Hübler

Study Period (dd/mm/yy)

18/10/21-18/02/22

Mode and Time

Synchronous and asynchronous, Time (CET): to be announced

Online Tool for Teaching

Webex, Stud.IP

Language of Instruction

English

Target Group

Master

Fields of study: Agriculture, Nutrition, Natural or Environmental Sciences, Economics, Political Sciences

Prerequisites

Basic understanding of economics; English: B2

ECTS

6

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